fbpx
Connect with us
  • Elysium

Interviews

Think Therapy 1st – ‘Never say never’

NR Times learns more about the Specialist Rehabilitation Occupational Therapy provider’s ‘can do’ approach to rehab

Published

on

‘You’ll never be able to’ is a phrase the team at Think Therapy 1st readily admit to actively fighting against. It certainly isn’t in their vocabulary when it comes to how they work with clients. 

“So many people are almost written off by medical professionals, even at the start of their rehab journey, but you’ll never hear that from us,” says managing director Helen Merfield.

“Instead of just saying ‘you’ll never be able to walk again’, if it’s remotely possible, we’ll do absolutely everything we can to get them walking again.”

And Specialist Rehabilitation Occupational Therapy (SROT) provider Think Therapy 1st has a stellar record when it comes to delivering such life-changing outcomes for clients across the country, in home and community-based settings.

From the woman told she’d never be able to walk again, who, following support from the team, was able to walk three miles around an air ambulance field with a walking frame to raise money for their charity. To the man told he’d never be able to live unsupported, who now lives completely independently and looks after his son every other weekend.

“We also had an 84 year-old lady who played badminton five or six times a week; I think she was semi-professional in her youth. She was told ‘you’ll never play badminton again’ and that destroyed her soul to start with,” recalls Helen, an ex-military nurse.

“Luckily, we said ‘Don’t listen to them. We’ll get you playing badminton again’. And we did. Five days a week.

“We had to adapt her serve, sometimes she used a chair, but she was playing and she was happy, and that’s exactly what we want to achieve for our clients.”

That commitment to overcoming the seemingly impossible is what Think Therapy 1st (TT1st) believes is its real difference.

By putting clients at the heart of the rehab, empowering them to take the lead on what they want to do, the TT1st OTs combine challenging and stimulating activities into therapy sessions which will enable them to progress.

“We wrap therapy around small, everyday tasks, and then build on that so they can get to where they need to be and get their lives back on track,” says Helen, whose fellow owner-directors are two OTs and a social worker.

“We explain the process of what we’re doing and why we’re doing it. So, for example, we might go on a woodland walk, which is maybe something they used to enjoy but haven’t done for a long time, they’ll also be working on their exercise tolerance, their coordination and general mobility.

“We’ll explain what we’re doing and why we’re doing it, and then they’re much more engaged in the process.”

TT1st also has a dedicated Children and Young Adults Service (CAYAS), which delivers specific paediatric support, provided with the same ‘never say never’ determination of its adult service.

“We had one boy who had a head injury, but prior to that he was up at 5am every day doing his newspaper round,” says Fiona Peters, CAYAS service lead.

“So, one of the first things I did with him was get him to draw me the map of his route, and then we went to walk it. And that helped him realise he’d forgotten part of it, but it was also really healing for him because he dropped in on a few people he used to deliver the newspapers to.

“Working with parents, I think it’s about drip feeding information. At first, they can be hypervigilant, wrapping their child in cotton wool, which

Helen Merfield and Fiona Peters

is understandable, protecting them from challenges.

“Our role is to support the parents to feel confident in confronting challenges rather than shy away or deny their children the opportunities these present to bring about positive change. It’s about ensuring the parents are aware of and engaged in the therapeutic process.”

“We really focus on embedding the learning, not through reams of paper or stuff to read on the computer; we help them to feel it, to understand it. And I feel like that’s where our speciality lies, in supporting them to understand their situation and to know where they can head with it,” says Helen.

“In what we do, the OT would be the head of the multidisciplinary team but we are standing arm in arm with the client.

“If they need physio, speech and language therapy, neuropsychology, any other modalities, the OT would work with them to help them engage those people. We make sure that we are aligning our goals in a really multidisciplinary way.

“For example, any neuropsychology outcomes would be really informative for our process of what to concentrate on with the client. We try to make sure that the goals are aligned so that it works in the client’s best interest at all times.

“But I think where we really do go that extra mile is in building in a relapse prevention plan whilst we are still involved, so people recognise what they’re doing, while they’re doing it. They are at the centre of the process – we don’t just want people to have things done to them, we want them to be part of it.”

Fiona adds: “Historically, people have been passive recipients of the medical model, just waiting for medical recommendations. We are changing the locus of control so the clients are full participants in their own rehab journey.

“We help our clients understand, that in order to get to the kitchen to make a cup of tea, which is what they really want to do, they could be doing things of benefit to their recovery – flexing their leg, building their standing tolerance, co-ordination, thinking, planning, and other executive functions as well.”

TT1st are also very definite about the time period they spend supporting a client – a maximum of 12 months of hands-on therapy, with up to three-months transition period.

“The analogy I like to use for transition is that it’s like having stabilisers on a bike, once you take the stabilisers off, you don’t just let them go and hope for the best,” says Helen.

“We want a person to be as independent as possible when we leave; they always know they can come to us if there’s a crisis or if something new is happening in their life, but the purpose of what we do is to train them and empower them to be autonomous.”

TT1st also has dedicated functional management of pain, fatigue and anxiety programmes. HELP – Holistic Education for Living with Pain, HEAL – Holistic Education for Anxiety Liberation, and  FEEL – Fatigue Education & Exploration for Living which correlate with NICE guidelines.

“We were finding that a lot of our clients suffered from pain, fatigue and anxiety when we met them, and the impact of having been left for a long time, without any support for this, had made things worse,” says Helen.

“People were being referred to us late; they’ve often become quite entrenched in the medicalised version of their health, and pain becomes a debilitating factor.

“The quicker we get them, no matter what the injury, the quicker we can get them better, because they haven’t become entrenched in the medical model.

“In our experience, pain is something doctors often disregard, but through holistic education, we can help make lasting changes to how people control and live with pain.”

The business, established six years ago, has built a strong reputation for its service – and particularly its outcomes – and continues to expand. With a core team of in-house OTs, it has growing numbers of associates across the country who deliver its bespoke support to clients.

“Cases come to us from all over the country, and we identify local OTs with the appropriate skills to work with each client,” says Helen.

“One of our in-house OTs acts as the long-arm mentor on every case. We meet monthly to review each case, and every single one is discussed by all the team. So, there will be seven OTs and a nurse looking at all the cases, to make sure they’re on track.”

Fiona adds: “I think OTs are used to working within boundaries, but when they join us, they suddenly see they have limitless potential.

“We believe that if you can clinically reason why something is beneficial to a client, we can generally find a way of supporting that, and finding the funding to achieve it.”

HIWIN

Trending