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How the power of football is increasing brain injury support

The partnership between Liverpool County FA and The Brain Charity is helping to raise both awareness and funds for survivors

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A new partnership is harnessing the power of football to help increase support for people living with brain injuries and other neurological conditions. 

Liverpool County FA is working alongside The Brain Charity to raise both funds and awareness around the impact brain illness or injury can have on individuals and families. It is also supporting the frontline work of the charity in delivering support across Merseyside and, increasingly, the wider UK. 

The two-year partnership is building on the love of football to help engage people, and hopes it can particularly target men, who can be a hard to reach group who are reluctant to seek support. 

In another strand of the initiative, Liverpool County FA will work alongside its new charity partner to help grassroots football clubs and leagues to be more dementia-friendly, and learn how to recognise early warning signs and offer support. 

It will also help to raise awareness of the growing links between football and neurodegenerative illness – building further on the work of the FA nationally with its guidance around high-force heading in training to help grassroots players understand the risks. 

Daniel Green, CEO of Liverpool County FA, says the partnership will offer support to brain injury survivors in a host of ways. 

“We hope it will be quite diverse. As well as the financial support we can hopefully give to The Brain Charity, we are looking at areas which could potentially include employment and volunteering and how we can work together, be it through support around education, coaching and CPD qualifications, for some of the their clients,” he says. 

“If we can use football to tackle some of the social isolation they may have been experiencing and rebuild their confidence, then then we believe we’ve got a real role to play locally. 

“Football can cater for all demographics, male and female, young and old, but we know the male population can be particularly hard to reach. Football is still quite a male dominated game, and while this goes more broadly than just neurological issues, men don’t tend to talk very openly, or will maybe be more flippant, in talking about what troubles them. 

“The Brain Charity have identified a real target audience that they want to work with, and to potentially use the power of football to get to those individuals to feel more comfortable talking about and identifying what those issues may be.” 

Another key aspect of the partnership focuses on the high-profile issue of dementia in football, with Liverpool County FA working with The Brain Charity to raise awareness of the signs and impact of the illness. 

“There is the wider issue and ongoing work around dementia linked to football, and back in July the FA issued their updated guidance for amateur and youth football, both male and female. So this is something we are raising awareness of, and how to spot those early signs of dementia too,” says Daniel. 

“This could be among people who have had a career in football, or they may not have done, but it’s about how we can all work together to spot those symptoms, and identify the actions that friends, family and people’s wider networks can take to support people from recognising the signs through to managing the symptoms. 

“And also, one of the big challenges The Brain Charity have identified is, it’s one thing that clients receive the medical support and advice that they need, but it’s another thing to look at their own physical wellbeing alongside that.

“We’re keen to use the facilities at our disposal to link the two elements. So an individual may receive some counselling through The Brain Charity, and we’ll then help facilitate a walking football session, or something of that nature, so that they’re getting not only the medical advice that they need, but also that physical wellbeing piece for them. 

“We can provide that safe environment whereby they can talk openly, to try and find that normality again for them and rebuild that confidence. We’re also keen to work with our local clubs to see how we can work together to reintegrate people back into a football environment, but in a manner that is sensitive to some of the challenges they may face – but that’s in its early stages.”

Nanette Mellor, CEO of The Brain Charity, said: “We can’t wait to get to work delivering a programme of physical activities, awareness campaigns, fundraising appeals and volunteering opportunities in partnership with their staff and wider grassroots network.

“Liverpool County FA’s key value of ‘Football for All’ matches our own wholehearted commitment to fighting for an inclusive society.

“We are excited to improve the health and wellbeing of people with neurological conditions across Merseyside, with their support.”

Daniel adds: “Through discussions very early on with The Brain Charity there’s a lot that we need to try and get to grips of, but there’s also a lot of opportunities as well. 

“We hope that through the two-year partnership we will be able to put in place the service provision and structures so that when the two years come to an end, the work will be able to continue, so we can continue to support people with neurological conditions for the long term.”

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