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‘Promote aquatic exercise for MS patients’

Barriers to participation must be reduced to ensure the wellbeing of people with Multiple Sclerosis, a report recommends

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Barriers to exercise – and particularly aquatic exercise – for patients living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) should be reduced, a study concluded. 

Many people with MS report difficulties engaging in traditional land-based physical activity due to heat sensitivity and physical disability, meaning aquatic exercise is often a suitable alternative. 

In new Kessler Foundation research, 100 per cent of people with MS who had tried aquatic exercise said they preferred it to land-based alternatives. 

However, their participation has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The study found that while 56 per cent of people participated in exercise during the restrictions, only seven per cent took part solely in aquatic exercise. 

Although that was the preferred option by individuals with experience with this type of exercise, lack of access to pools and the costs associated with access were significant barriers.

Now, as we move on from the pandemic, the study’s authors have urged barriers to be removed from MS patients’ participation in aquatic exercise. 

“Clinicians should encourage their patients with MS to resume exercising as pandemic restrictions ease,” said Dr Helen Genova. 

“Given the benefits of aquatic exercise for people with MS, and the finding that it was preferred, it is worthwhile to look at reducing barriers to this type of exercise. 

“Encouraging community organisations and health and wellness programs to sponsor affordable aquatic exercise activities for people with MS would lower the barriers for participation, especially for the economically disadvantaged.”

Available treatments for MS have limitations in terms of symptomatic relief of the array of physical and cognitive symptoms experienced by many individuals, which has spurred interest in the role of health-related behaviours in minimising MS-related disability. 

As a health-related behaviour with known benefits on gait, balance, mood, and fatigue, exercise is a key topic in providing some antidote. 

In the study, researchers conducted an online survey of 179 individuals with MS about their exercise activities from October 2020 to April 2021, which established a general decrease in levels of activity, but also highlighted the importance of water-based activity in people’s lives. 

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