Connect with us
  • Elysium

Stroke news

Why there is a rise in stroke in Millennials?

“Funding for stroke continues to lag behind other major health conditions, despite being one of the leading causes of death and disability in the UK.”

Published

on

Stroke can affect people of all ages, yet still has the stigma that it is only the elderly that can have a stroke.

The average age for stroke, for both male and female is over 70, however, due to a wave of strokes in Millennials the average age is on the decline. 

Young stroke survivors like Jade Kenny, believe that there is a “There is a big stigma, a huge stigma against young people having strokes.” Jade, who was just 21-years-old when she had her stroke, shared her story with SR Times, which you can read here.

New research published in the Scientific American, has shown that Millennials are having more strokes at the same age than the previous generation, which is reversing a 40-year decline in stroke deaths.

2003 to 2012 saw a 32 per cent rise in strokes in those aged between 18 to 34 year old women, males had a 15 per cent rise.

There are multiple potential explanations as to why this rise in stroke in Millennials is occurring, for example, a drop in physical activity levels, rise in stress and fewer doctor visits.

Whilst speaking to Healthline, Cande Ananth, lead author on the study which predicts that Millennials will reverse the 40-year decline in rates of stroke, says: “There are a multitude of risk factors (including high BMI and obesity, smoking, and alcohol use, diabetes and hypertension being the most important) that predispose a person to increased risk of stroke deaths.”

Again, speaking to Healthline, Dr Atif Zafar, a telestroke neuroradiologist, says: “As life and work [have] become more demanding due to technology and the increasing efficiency in the world, millennials have less time for themselves, and hence their personal health is being compromised.”

Austin Willett, CEO of Different Strokes, the charity devoted to helping young stroke survivors, tells SR Times: “It’s clear that strokes in younger people are on the rise. The recent research by Scientific American is yet more evidence of this, not just in the USA but across the world.

Funding for stroke continues to lag behind other major health conditions, despite being one of the leading causes of death and disability in the UK, while appropriate treatment for younger stroke has long been underfunded.

It is always encouraging to see new research on younger stroke, particularly when it allows us to better understand the health inequalities and disparities faced by younger survivors. We need everyone to know that strokes are not exclusive to the elderly and anyone can have a stroke at any time.”

HIWIN

Trending