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Brain Charity offers neurodiversity training nationally

The national roll-out follows a successful pilot project to enable employers to offer increased support

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Specialists from The Brain Charity are rolling out neurodiversity training to businesses across the country following a successful pilot project. 

The charity has created its own training programme in response to demand from employers nationally who are keen to increase support for people within their organisation who have neurological conditions and consider themselves neurodivergent.

The Brain Charity has now created a series of workshops – ranging from hour-long to full days – which can be delivered in person or online, to help meet the needs of businesses around the country. 

Its pilot session, in Liverpool’s Strawberry Fields, saw a positive response from a range of businesses, all of which welcomed the need for such training in an area which traditionally has been under-resourced in terms of workplace support. 

Now, the sessions – led by training manager Jane Cullen, who has a background in in-house training roles with major corporates – are on offer to businesses from any sector and equip them with the skills and knowledge to implement neurodiversity in areas including recruitment, adapting workplaces, working practices and reasonable adjustments and becoming a Disability Confident employer. 

The training, a new initiative from The Brain Charity, generates income for the Liverpool-based organisation to fund its vital frontline work in delivering practical, emotional and social support to people living with brain injuries and neurological conditions across the country. 

“We sadly continue to hear about people who feel they need to conceal their condition at interview or in the workplace due to discrimination and stigma around neurological conditions, but we’re really encouraged by the increasing numbers of employers who want to introduce neurodiversity training to make their organisations inclusive and diverse,” says Nanette Mellor, CEO of The Brain Charity.

“People with neurological conditions have a range of skills which are of huge benefit to businesses, and with the right support for employers and them knowing the adjustments they can make, the workplace can be a very positive environment for everyone.   

“We have raised awareness with businesses informally in the past, but realised the need for formal training was there, based on the numbers of organisations from around the country who were getting in touch.

“Now, we have the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver bespoke training to managers within businesses directly, and help them be more confident in how they are supporting people whose conditions may be ‘hidden’. 

“Companies absolutely should be more aware of neurodiversity and what that means to them and their employees, and hopefully our training can help them achieve that.”

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