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Cognitive Rehab Coach – harnessing the power of remote therapy

Inspired by seeing the impact digital could make in rehab, Natalie Mackenzie has gone on to build an internationally-successful business

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Out of the necessity to pivot to digital during the early days of the pandemic, an international online business – The Cognitive Rehab Coach – has been created to support people living with the impact of concussion and brain injury around the world. 

The Cognitive Rehab Coach was born from seeing how effective remote support could be for clients who are eager and able to embrace it, with people from the United States to New Zealand now benefitting from therapy delivered from the UK. 

Founder Natalie Mackenzie, a highly-esteemed cognitive rehab therapist and also director of BIS Services, runs both individual and group sessions across the globe – something she admits she embarked on from the greater acceptance of the quality and impact of virtual therapy which has come from COVID-19. 

“I still do client work and love doing client work, but the challenges of running a business often mean you can’t do as much as you’d like. You can get very lost in the running of a business when you’re a clinician. So this has been very interesting and led by the changes in digital offering we’ve seen from COVID,” she says. 

“Through delivering therapy this way, I can do a large amount of client work with much less travel time and greater reach.

“With the BIS, we can spend anywhere between two and eight hours with a client. I’ve got clients who are two hours away, so I can spend six hours of my day only seeing a client for two hours. 

“But with the Cognitive Rehab Coach, I can spend six hours online with six different different groups or six different clients. It’s kind of brought back the reason why I love the work that I do.

“Clients can be a bit more autonomous and self-led with the learning and assignments I give them, so they can be shorter packages, but with the same level of information they’re being given. 

“That also led on to me doing group programmes. That kind of one-to-many offering through small groups, in addition to the one-to-one sessions, are proving to be really effective. 

“But it was through what we did with BIS that showed me what was and wasn’t possible. The virtual timetable was a huge learning curve for me in terms of what clients will tolerate right in a group online setting – which at BIS is not a lot – whereas the concussion and post-concussion syndrome demographic find that slightly easier. There have been a lot of lessons.”

And the lessons in what was possible also extended into what was essentially a ‘needs must’. 

For many clients at BIS Services – which delivers innovative in-person cognitive rehabilitation to clients living with brain injury and neurological problems across the country – the experience of digital adoption into therapy was rather more challenging. 

“We did take our virtual timetable online for a period of time, we did pivot to adapt to the challenges of staffing and keeping clients and staff safe,” she says. 

“But now, the only time we go digitally is if someone is in isolation and we can flip back into the online support. We do face the same challenges with engagement and being able to functionally practice things with clients, but at least we know it will be for a short period of time. And the transition is much easier now, too. 

“But for BIS and our team of RAs (rehab assistants), all of whom have been specifically matched to each client, wherever possible, we’ll do face to face. But although that’s from a therapy point of view, that’s not to say digital hasn’t been really important in many other ways.”

But while Kent-based BIS has not adopted digital as a core part of its therapy offering to clients, it has proven to be effective in other ways. Through the creation of online events and opportunities, clients continued to be challenged and stimulated. 

“Our weekly quiz night became a therapeutic activity, as well as a bit of fun,” says Natalie. 

“We had a group of people who really got on well, but you’d probably never have put those people in a room together. It was the one it was the one activity that we kept going for the longest because clients were so engaged in it. 

“We rotated themes and gave clients the opportunity to write a quiz themselves, and we know hours of work went into that 45-minute quiz. It was a lovely thing to see.

“We also did a couple of comedy nights where the clients did comedy for us, and we would record it for them. I thought that was really brave to do that in front of your peers. Then the following week, the client would then review it as part of their learning to see what they wanted to improve on.

“These were ways in which Zoom did really deliver some great benefits to us.”

And in terms of its impact on how BIS operates, technology has also delivered benefits in terms of staff training and supervision. 

With 45 rehab assistants across the South of England, and extending as far north as Manchester, the opportunity to unite the team online rather than in person has been a very welcome opportunity. 

“They’re all so busy with clients that to even find one day a quarter where we bring everyone in for training can be really prohibitive,” says Natalie. 

“But now, I’ll deliver it live for any staff who can’t be here in person, and then it’s made available on our virtual library. For supervisions too, you don’t want to have people coming down from Manchester, spending all those hours travelling, when you can do it online now.”

Online training and learning has been a key area of development and acceptance, within BIS and for countless other organisations around the world. For Natalie too, she has embarked on her own digital learning experience, securing qualification as an ADHD coach. 

“I have a lot of brain injured clients with ADHD, but there isn’t an ADHD coaching course in the UK. I ended up doing a year-long course in America and the ability to train digitally has been amazing,” she says. 

“While the opportunity would have been available before COVID, I guess it wasn’t as accepted, my preference would probably have been face to face. But now, there is much greater awareness and acceptance, because it works and we’re all seeing that.”

Going forward, digital will continue to be a key part in the administration role of BIS, and of course will be fundamental to the continued growth of the Cognitive Rehab Coach – although the early experiences of COVID showed Natalie and her team the need to avoid becoming over-reliant on its use for some very human reasons. 

“In clinical work, we’re not used to being on computers for six or seven hours a day, let alone the challenges of talking pretty continuously for that long,” says Natalie. 

“We had really bad headaches and were just so tired, we even started having problems with our vision. I remember losing my voice for a couple of days too. 

“But now, we have got into what I think is a good working pattern, where we can flip to digital for our clients if we need, but we’ve learnt what works and what doesn’t. We are now using that to our advantage and making it work best for everyone.”

  • Natalie will be speaking at the Virtually Successful conference next week, organised by Remote Rehab in association with NR Times. For more information and to sign up, visit here

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